Terry Edwards

2016 Trends: What’s in store for providers?

By Terry Edwards  /  21 Jan 2016

As I mentioned in my post last week, despite healthcare’s slow-moving reputation, many of the players are moving quickly to re-steer the ship and transition to value-based population health management. Yes, population health an overused phrase with too many definitions, but it’s also the biggest change in healthcare since the invention of penicillin, and will form the backdrop for many of the trends that will change the way healthcare organizations operate and deliver care in 2016:

  1. Roles between payers, providers, vendors will blur. Consolidation in healthcare isn’t new, and I see this trend continuing into 2016. After all, consolidation is still the best strategy for organizations to get scale to reduce costs, freeing up more resources to increase innovation in everything from new modes of care delivery to payment models. As organizations grow, we can expect that the role of each player will shift so that the lines between payers, providers and even vendors, will blur to the point where they’re nearly unrecognizable. In 2016, more IDNs will create their own payer branches, and we’ll also see more large health systems develop their own proprietary technology, either on their own or in partnership with both startups and established technology vendors to help deliver their own population health strategy.
  1. The continuing shift to patient-centered care will bring patients and their families into the care team. It can be difficult for patients with multiple chronic conditions to navigate the complexities of follow-up appointments, medication regiments and other therapies. Their providers, who are often strapped for time and resources, can find it hard to coordinate patient care effectively. We’re going to see increased demand for remote care managers, who are responsible for hundreds of patients with chronic conditions. The remote care manager will be an increasingly important member of the broader patient care team and be able to remotely monitor all of their patients using sensors and analytics to identify each patient’s condition, enabling the coordinator to proactively reach out to patients and intervene before a situation becomes an emergency. Families and friends, too, will have a bigger role to play in a patient’s care. Providers will start using tools like text notifications and social media to loop in a patient’s support network so that they can reiterate important information, facilitate follow-up visits and help patients stick to their medication regiment.
  1. Providers will need to create new methods to provide patients and clinicians relevant information from ALL points of care. No longer do patients need to schedule an in-person visit with their primary care physician for a simple prescription. Retail clinics at CVS and Walmart – as well as virtual visits via telehealth – make it possible for patients to get care quickly. While the increase in access points to care is a positive development, it can lead to disjointed and fragmented care. In 2016, providers will continue to struggle with how to manage all fragmented patient visits (after all, that’s what the acquisition of PCPs was supposed to resolve.) One option to corral all of these independent visits will be a new kind of patient portal—or rather, a wellness application—that gives patients and clinicians information from all points of care, whether it’s a hospital, PCP, specialist, retail clinic or other emerging care delivery method. This new kind of wellness application will tether multiple existing portals and make it possible to aggregate information from all providers, regardless of their healthcare system affiliation, which may help prevent medical mistakes and duplicate testing in addition to providing much needed increased convenience.

The next few years are going to be an exciting time to work in healthcare. What trends and changes do you see on the horizon? What did I miss? Let me know here, or via Twitter @PerfectServeCEO

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