Don Dally

The outdated browser: breeding ground for cybercrime

By Don Dally, chief technology officer at PerfectServe  /  10 Mar 2016

Is your health system’s browser up to date? Too many organizations don’t know the answer to that question and are unaware of the consequences for using unsupported browsers. Or, if they do know the answer, they aren’t in a position to act on it.

Now is the time to check if your workstations are using the latest browser version available. Earlier this year, Microsoft announced that it was discontinuing support for Internet Explorer versions 8, 9 and 10. The discontinuation of this support may affect more people than you think. The loss of this support means Microsoft will no longer provide vital security patches for these browser versions, increasing vulnerabilities that go unattended, and leaving healthcare organizations wide open for attacks. This should come as no surprise to healthcare stakeholders, who’ve seen cyberattacks increase in recent years, especially in the healthcare industry. Hackers will find a way to exploit these vulnerabilities. It’s not a matter or IF, but WHEN.

There are two main reasons why outdated browsers linger:

  1. A clinical application doesn’t support modern browsers—Many healthcare providers are running older versions of browsers because they use a legacy application from a vendor that will not work on more contemporary browser versions. In basic terms, the application is holding them back.
  2. The provider organization is not updating the browser—If, for whatever reason, the provider is not updating its browser, it requires vendors to spend an inordinate amount of time and effort making sure their applications will work across the various (often outdated) browser versions used by their customers.

Browser upgrades are a two way street: providers must make sure they are using the most up-to-date browser version for vital security updates while vendors must make sure that their applications and solutions can support contemporary and future browser versions so they are not holding their users back.

How to keep current

Although browser choice can be an overlooked decision, it’s important that both vendors and providers stay on top of the latest versions. Here are some steps to help providers and/or vendors break the cycle of using outdated browsers:

  • Vendors should be held accountable for keeping pace with browser evolution
  • If you have a legacy application that requires an older browser, keep the browser on the workstation current and use virtualization to serve up an older browser for the legacy app
  • Ensure your organization has procedures in place to keep your browsers updated and properly patched

If you’re not sure whether you are using the most up-to-date browser, check here to see the newest version of your browser that’s available. We all have to step up to the plate and stay current. It is no longer an issue of convenience; it is a matter of patient privacy.

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